How has economy fared since brexit vote_ – bbc news

Mrs May has met EU leaders including Germany’s Angela Merkel and French president Francois Hollande, but formal negotiations on the UK’s departure from, and its future relationship with, the EU have yet to start.

The government has not yet set out in detail what it wants from the talks, with reported differences between key figures on the balance between free trade and immigration curbs.

Mrs May has faced repeated calls to set out what she wants Brexit to look like, but has refused, saying there will be “no running commentary”.

Although David Davis has been appointed Secretary of State for Leaving the European Union, it is as yet unclear whether he will be leading the UK’s negotiating team on a day-to-day basis.

The UK’s top official in Brussels, Sir Ivan Rogers, resigned in early January – urging civil servants to continue to “challenge ill-founded arguments and muddled thinking” about the process.


In his resignation letter, the UK’s permanent representative to the EU warned that there was a shortage of “serious multilateral negotiating experience” in the civil service and it was essential his successor, later named as Sir Tim Barrow, was “centrally involved in the negotiations if the UK is to achieve the best possible outcomes”.

Mrs May has met EU leaders including Germany’s Angela Merkel and French president Francois Hollande, but formal negotiations on the UK’s departure from, and its future relationship with, the EU have yet to start.

The government has not yet set out in detail what it wants from the talks, with reported differences between key figures on the balance between free trade and immigration curbs.

Mrs May has faced repeated calls to set out what she wants Brexit to look like, but has refused, saying there will be “no running commentary”.

Although David Davis has been appointed Secretary of State for Leaving the European Union, it is as yet unclear whether he will be leading the UK’s negotiating team on a day-to-day basis.

The UK’s top official in Brussels, Sir Ivan Rogers, resigned in early January – urging civil servants to continue to “challenge ill-founded arguments and muddled thinking” about the process.

In his resignation letter, the UK’s permanent representative to the EU warned that there was a shortage of “serious multilateral negotiating experience” in the civil service and it was essential his successor, later named as Sir Tim Barrow, was “centrally involved in the negotiations if the UK is to achieve the best possible outcomes”.