Education _ world bank blogs

With the release last month of the latest PISA (Program for International Student Assessment) results by the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development), it is apparent that many of the highest achieving students in the world are in East Asia.

Just as in the recently released TIMSS (Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study) results, Singapore leads the world in every subject in PISA, outperforming other economies and countries by a significant margin. Rural commercial bank Students in Singapore perform at a level that is up to two years ahead of their regional and OECD counterparts in science, mathematics and reading. Rizal rural bank Moreover, almost all Singaporean students have reached a basic level of proficiency or higher.


Regional rural bank act And they just keep getting better, having significantly reduced performance below basic proficiency.

Japan also outperforms most participating economies in science, mathematics and reading. Regional rural bank pension However, its score in reading has declined since the last round. Www regional rural bank Still, as in Singapore, 90% of students have reached a basic level of proficiency or above.

The World Bank’s EduTech blog seeks to “explore issues related to the use of information and communications technologies (ICTs) to benefit education in developing countries”. About regional rural bank Over the past eight years, it has highlighted an eclectic batch of related new research and explored emerging ‘good practices’ (and more than a few bad ones as well). Dumpong rural bank Along the way, it has briefly documented and analyzed a wide variety of interesting projects and programs around the world seeking to use new technologies in the education sector. Rural bank exam In doing so, it has perhaps posed (and re-framed) many more questions than it has it has provided hard-and-fast ‘answers’.

Given the fast-changing nature of so much of our world today, and the expectation that the pace of technology-enabled change is unlikely to slow, it is an abiding conceit of this blog that our individual and collective ability to ask better questions related to the use of new technologies and technology-enabled approaches in education (not only about what we should be doing, and when, and where, but especially about the why and the how) will become an increasingly critical skill to develop and cultivate. Ibps rural bank There is no shortage of edtech-related ‘solutions’ marketed around the world, but are they addressing the right problems and most critical challenges? As Wadi Haddad likes to ask: If technology is the answer, what is the question?

The blog seeks, perhaps rather presumptively, to inject an evidence-based, practical tonic into various debates and deliberations about the use of new technologies in the education sector that are, in many places, often characterized by ideological extremes and a general lack of knowledge about what’s actually happening ‘on-the-ground’, especially in many emerging economies and so-called ‘developing countries’ around the world. Regional rural bank list While the blog deliberately attempts to adopt a general tone and perspective of fairness and objectivity, ‘balance’ can admittedly be a rather elusive goal when trying to navigate between the giddy utopianism of many techno-enthusiasts (especially among many in Silicon Valley, and more than a few politicians) and the sometimes rather crotchety conservatism of the reflexively anti-technology (indeed, often anti-change) crowd. Regional rural bank previous year question paper In theory, there should be a vast space between these two poles; in practice, such middle ground can often be hard to find, or negotiate, in many places in the world.

The historian Melvin Kranzberg famously opined that technology is neither positive nor negative, nor is it neutral. Bosomtwe rural bank What is clear, however, is that there will increasingly be much more of it, all around us — including in our schools, and embedded within teaching and learning practices in communities pretty much everywhere: rich and poor, urban and rural. Mumuadu rural bank Yes, technology-fueled ‘revolutions’ in education have been promised for almost a century now, but even if the related change (for better and/or worse) has been long in coming, there is little denying that there is much change afoot these days (again, for better and/or worse). Regional rural bank ppt How can we make better decisions about what’s important, and what isn’t, and how we can tell the difference? By highlighting some interesting things happening in parts of the world that you may not have heard (or thought much) about, the EduTech blog continues to try, in an admittedly modest and incomplete way, to help provide fodder for related discussion, discourse and disagreement in educational policymaking circles in many countries.

What follows below is a quick outline of the top EduTech blog posts from 2016. Regional rural bank recruitment 2015 If you’re new to the blog, please do feel to browse our ‘back catalog’ as well, as many of the ‘hits’ from past years continue somehow to draw in large numbers of readers, in a number of cases even more than for the new stuff. Abokobi rural bank (Here, for what it’s worth, are links to the top posts of 2015; 2014; 2013; 2012; 2011; 2010; and 2009.)

The blog went on a bit of a hiatus for part of 2016, so there is much in the queue that will appear in the early months of 2017. Meaning of rural bank As always, the best way to be notified when new posts appear is to subscribe to us on Twitter (@ WBedutech) and/or enter your email address into the ‘subscribe by email’ box that appears in the right column of your screen if you are reading this on a desktop (the mobile-optimized version of the blog omits this functionality, unfortunately). Rural bank notification If you want a sneak peek at topics in the pipeline, as well as links to related news, projects and research papers, you may want to check out the Twitter account of the blog’s principal author.

Thanks for taking time out of your busy schedule to visit this blog — and good luck with whatever projects or decisions you may be considering for the New Year!

The Little Rose preschool is situated at the base of a fifty-foot high landfill in Colombo’s Kolonnawa Division. Despite being next to one of Sri Lanka’s largest waste sites, the one room preschool is spotless. Regional rural bank pdf Inside, 23 children from ages 3 to 5 sit on colorful plastic chairs, dressed immaculately in ‘Little Rose’ uniforms.

Running a preschool in one of Colombo’s biggest slums isn’t easy, but head teacher R. Regional rural bank notification 2015 A. Regional rural bank exam Shalika Sajeevani exudes positivity. R r b regional rural bank “The children don’t always bring snacks, so once a week, I make lunch for all of them at my home. Regional rural bank merger It’s not a big deal – I cook for my own two sons anyway, I just put in a little extra for them,” she says.

The students are supposed to pay LKR 500 ($3.40) per month as school fees, but most are only occasionally able to do so. Regional rural bank act 1976 In spite of this, Sajeevani ensures that the preschool doors are open to all children in the neighborhood as many parents in this underserved community cannot afford to pay.

She pays her assistant and covers other expenses from the money collected and retains the rest as salary, a meagre amount of LKR 5,000 ($34) a month. Regional rural bank wiki Though this is barely enough to survive in Sri Lanka’s fast growing capital, she has come to work everyday for the last ten years.

Students of the Sri Sambuddhaloka Preschool settle down on the floor for their mid-morning snack. Regional rural bank previous year question papers With minimal facilities, this school is currently serving 97 toddlers from one of Colombo’s many low income communities. Credit: Renu Warnasuriya / World Bank

In a country with a well-structured free education system covering primary, secondary, and tertiary education, the state has traditionally provided little in terms of preschool education and care. What is regional rural bank However, evidence and experience has shown that ECCE improves school readiness and learning outcomes, which ultimately translates into better occupational status and earnings and yields much higher rates of return on investment.

According to the recent report, “ Laying the Foundation for Early Childhood Education in Sri Lanka: Investing Early, Investing Smartly, and Investing for All”, Sri Lanka’s public spending on education as a percentage of its economy was the lowest in South Asia and its spending on early childhood education (ECE) is significantly lower than the global average.

While the country boasts of a near universal primary school enrollment rate, only about half of its 3 to 5 year-olds are enrolled in preschools which are not primarily covered by the state. Regional rural banks in india Around 60 percent of preschools are run by the private sector and 24 percent by the other organizations and religious groups.

Income and location are found to be among the key determinants of access to ECCE. Regional rural bank in india Children from the richest 20 percent of the population are 17 percent more likely to be enrolled in preschools than children from the poorest 20 percent. Regional rural bank history Enrollment rates in urban areas is 10 percent higher than enrollment in rural or estate areas. Regional rural bank india Many centers in the country do not have adequate learning materials and quality teachers, coupled with the lack of standardized curricula and teaching facilities. Regional rural banks act 1976 Many teachers to their credit, have to depend on their own creativity to develop activities and teaching methods.